A description of water as the life blood of the planet earth

Solid water can't act as a lubricant for the molecular processes of life, so the search is on for liquid water -- a commodity that is far more rare in the universe. Philip Ballauthor of the book, " Life's Matrix: A Biography of Water ," says that liquid water is essential for the kind of delicate chemistry that makes life possible.

A description of water as the life blood of the planet earth

Water is central to our planet. Every living thing requires it. Everything that has ever lived required it. Without liquid water, the Earth is a barren, lifeless rock. Fortunately, the Earth has abundant water. The Formation of the Oceans We can fairly well tell how they probably occurred.

Volcanoes shoot out water vapor when they erupt. Volcanoes would have been blowing this water vapor into the atmosphere for millions of years before the oceans formed.

For a significant chunk of time, however, the earth was a giant ball of molten lava. This kept all of the water in vapor form. When the Earth began to cool, the water condensed and formed the oceans.

Certainly there was water on Earth before the oceans appeared, but none of it was liquid. There are two schools of thought on when the oceans formed.

A description of water as the life blood of the planet earth

The first and more popular school believes that the oceans appeared around million years after the formation of the Earth. There is, however, a smaller school of scientists who believe the Earth may have had oceans from as little as million years after its formation.

They say that the presence of zircons, a type of crystal, as old as 4. Water on Earth There are some competing theories on how water came to be on Earth as well.

One theory says that comets, some of which contain ice, rammed into the Earth and provided all our water. The competing school of thought thinks that water was already present in the Earth when it formed. The water on early Earth was a bit different than what we have today.

The first oceans were, as today, salty. They were probably much saltier than our current seas though. Scientists think the first oceans were about 1. The salt in the seas came mostly from volcanic activity and underwater volcanic rock.

Funnily enough, this volcanic activity also helped to create fresh water. Once there were bodies of land, fresh water pooled. The first life forms on Earth could exist because of water. Some say comets carried life from elsewhere to our oceans, some say lighting sparked chemical reactionsothers say a great many other things.

All we know is that water arrived shortly before life. It is not known whether they first existed in fresh or salt water.

A description of water as the life blood of the planet earth

Most people believe that life first existed in the seas because all organisms on Earth use salt in some way. Even cyanobacteriathought to be the earliest form of life, would have a hard time surviving in oceans twice as salty as today.

No matter where they first arrived or what they had to do to survivelife did survive on Earth. Join us next time as we further explore the beginnings of our world and the origins of life.

Our next article in The Mother Earth Series will explore the early earth in greater detail. To keep up with the rest of the series, why not subscribe to our RSS feed.Life in Cold Blood is a BBC nature documentary series written and presented by David Attenborough, first broadcast in the United Kingdom from 4 February on BBC One..

A study of the evolution and habits of amphibians and reptiles, it is the sixth and last of Attenborough's specialised surveys following his major trilogy that began with Life on Earth. Without it this planet would be a desert.

Water covers over 70 percent of the earth's surface and fresh water makes up % of the total water supply across the planet of which 70 percent is in the form of snow and ice packs in the Polar Regions.

96 percent of ALL water is found in the oceans and seas and less than 2 percent in ground water with less than one percent in rivers, streams and lakes. Today, we’ll be covering the role of water in our early earth.

Earth's orbit

Water is central to our planet. Every living thing requires it. Everything that has ever lived required it. Without liquid water, the Earth is a barren, lifeless rock. Fortunately, the Earth has abundant water. The Formation of the Oceans. We can fairly well tell how they probably occurred.

Jun 15,  · Review of The Story of Water, U.K., (in the U.S., The Spiritual Life of Water), a book by Alick Bartholomew “If only we could see that water is the essential life blood of the planet and cannot be separated from the natural environment, we could then start to work with nature whose husbandry of.

Internet Looks Earth: description and images of planet Earth: Earth The Earth is the third planet from the sun. About 71% of its surface is covered by water; the rest by land. The planet has a significant magnetic field. It is orbited by one satellite, the Moon.

The Earth’s atmosphere is primarily Nitrogen (N 2), Water. It's found everywhere on Earth, from the polar ice caps to steamy geysers. And wherever water flows on this planet, you can be sure to find life.

Planet Earth: Facts About Its Orbit, Atmosphere & Size