How to write a myth about earthquakes in japan

Faustmann Delve into an area that interests you about earthquakes and then focus on a subject within it. Earthquakes cover as much ground in essay writing as they do in the real world. You can relate a personal earthquake experience, describe the steps to become a seismologist, narrate the earthquake history of a certain location or compare earthquakes to other natural disasters. Then you can choose to describe your topic, narrate a specific incident, analyze earthquake effects or argue for a better earthquake coping mechanism.

How to write a myth about earthquakes in japan

By David Bressan on Friday, September 17, Lockwood at " Outside the Interzone " is celebrating Thorsday with an special appearance of Lokiand deepening a bit in the topic I found a connection between ancient Norse Myth and Seismology.

how to write a myth about earthquakes in japan

In Norse mythology, compiled and written down in the 13th century, Fenris or Fenrir the most common old Norse names, meaning "fen-dweller" is the name given to a monstrous wolf, son of the god Loki and the giantess Angrboda. So they decided to bind and capture him, two fetters were forged, but the wolf easily tear them apart.

But the third fetter, called Gleipnir, was made from six mythical ingredients: When Fenris howls in his anger, the ground and mountains tremble violently and deep fractures form and rocks were thrown around. This myth and the description resemble what we would expect to see during a strong earthquake, but the Scandinavian Peninsula is today considered a relatively stable craton.

It has become clear that Sweden was subjected to an increased seismic activity at the time of deglaciation, 9. But probably these earthquakes happened long before the first colonization of the Peninsula. However in more recent times, the last 5.

But in the end I have to admit: Daniel in his blog "sandbian"as an expert of Swedish geology and history, points out various chronological and cultural deficiency of this hypothesis that tries to connect an imported culture with its symbols to possible seismic events happened more than 5.

Map of Sweden with areas of recorded palaeoseismic activity. Nine high-magnitude palaeoseismic events are recorded in the Late Holocene. Their ages in yBP are given in black outside the map frames. A few place names referring to noise or fractured rock are given outside the map frames.

Fact or Fiction?

The Fenris Wolf in the Nordic Asa creed in the light of palaeoseismics. Geological Society, London, Special Publications Earthquake Folklore in Japan June 20, by bestuhlmuller As the first two weeks of my research come to a close all I can think is: why oh why did I willingly choose to write a book!

Apr 25,  · In Japanese mythology, earthquakes were caused by a giant catfish called Namazu. He lives in the mud beneath Japan and the god, Kashima, restrains him with a stone.

When Kashima is distracted, Namazu thrashes about and causes an earthquake. In Japan there is the Namazu legend – Namazu is a type of catfish and it features prominently in Japanese folklore, often as a foreteller of major upheavals – be these floods or earthquakes.

In one of the versions of the tale the Namazu actually causes earthquakes. Mar 20,  · So, in Japan today, even though no one actually believes that earthquakes are caused by catfish, signs for earthquake evacuation shelters, earthquake evacuation routes and earthquake safety usually have a picture of a catfish.

Earthquakes cover as much ground in essay writing as they do in the real world.

how to write a myth about earthquakes in japan

You can relate a personal earthquake experience, describe the steps to become a seismologist, narrate the earthquake history of a certain location or compare earthquakes to other natural disasters.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

Earthquake Folklore in Japan - Upperclass Monroe Scholars Summer Research Projects